Stoneface Monday

Istanbul, Turkey Layover

At the Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts in Istanbul, “These double doors from the Great Mosque Of Cizre measure 300×112 cm [9.8×3.6 ft] and consist of a timber frame plated with beaten copper sheets attached to the wood by iron nails. They are elaborately decorated by brass rods forming an interlocking design of twelve-pointed stars, in the spaces between which are plaques with openwork designs of scrolls with rumi-palmette motifs. – The combination of dragons and lions is frequently encountered in Anatolian Artukid art and is attributed to have a protective significance and to symbolize the sun and the moon.” – The sülüs inscription band running across the door bear the name of a different Sultan, indicating the doors may have been a later addition during the course of repairs (sometime after 1208, the year Cezire’s reign began). – One of the two dragon door knobs was stolen in 1969 and taken to the David Collection in Copenhagen. • #istanbul #mosque #stolenart #ihavethisthingwithdoors #anatolia #dragonart #metalwork #islamicart #artukid #symbolicart #ancientart #muslimart #intricate #religiousart #islamicpattern #museumofislamicart #museumsoftheworld #🇹🇷 #🕌

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The Basilica Cistern, built in the 6th century and capable of holding 2.8 million cubic feet of water, has a ceiling supported by a forest of 336 columns. One of these is known as the Hen’s Eye column. – “One of the columns is engraved with raised pictures of a Hen's Eye, slanted braches, and tears. This column resembles the columns of the Triumphal Arch of Theodosius I from the 4th century (AD 379–395). Ancient texts suggest that the tears on the column pay tribute to the hundreds of slaves who died during the construction of the Basilica Cistern.” • #basilicacistern #istanbul #yerebatansarnıcı #byzantine #column #weepingcolumn #byzantinearchitecture #travelblog #carved #carvedstone #ancientplace #ihavethisthingwithcolumns #traveldiaries #ancientarchitecture #seetheworld #wanderlust #solotravel #historygram #ancientcity #spoliation #constantinople #🇹🇷

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Never did I expect to see more of the Ishtar Gate in person than what’s on view at the NY Met – this was an unexpected surprise I ran into coming around a corner at Istanbul’s Archaeology Museum. Very cool! – Built as a dedication to the Babylonian goddess Ishtar in 575 BCE, the gate was considered one of the original Seven Wonders of the World before being upstaged by the Lighthouse of Alexandria (3rd century BCE). – Ishtar was the Mesopotamian goddess of love, fertility, war and power, and the lion was considered one of her primary symbols. • #babylonian #mesopotamia #istanbul #archaeology #artifacts #mesopotamianart #istanbularchaeologicalmuseums #ishtar #ishtargate #lion #basrelief #ancientart #travelmore #instamuseum #travellife #soloyolo #sevenwonders #loveoldstuff #ihavethisthingwithtiles #historygram #exploreculture #goddess #ancientgods #polytheism #ancientculture #🦁 #🇹🇷 #📷

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